Sunday, April 23, 2017

Polly Toynbee, BBC , Soft Fleet Street

Just catching up on TV, missed it this morning.

Andrew Marr on YouTube already with Jeremy Corbyn interview.

Sunday Politics on BBC catchup.

Polly Toynbee as balance between the Sun and the Spectator. Difference of view on Jeremy Corbyn? Not a lot.

Would Labour use a drone against ISIS? Will the USA request such a thing? It may turn out that the relevant issues during the election are not those supposed by the Fleet Street / BBC news operation.

Andrew Marr claimed that Corbyn and May similar on Brexit as both want a Single Market. Who is sure about this? Who has eaten the cake and or kept it? Surely May will be asked some questions later.

But Guardian columnists mostly just knocking Corbyn one would guess.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

notes on mode 1 , mooc etc

Later there will be another post on online courses, starting with business schools.

Probably a longer one ahead of BETT next year. There is not enough reporting on what happens.

I base my guess on the Guardian still. Both what appears and what is hidden or mostly hidden. "special report" on 7 March can't find on official website but is on Pressreader. Seems to have been supported in print by half page ad from University of Derby. They are mentioned, as is Falmouth and Imperial.

MOOC mention in last column, then Futurelearn.

I still think Futurelearn is major news, as was obvious at BETT.

Helena Pozniak is a freelance journalist, this "special report" is not part of the main education pages.

Page 35 Peter Scott complains about commercial pressure but no mention of MOOC or even tech. My guess is still that the innovation will not come from the existing research stars, see previous posts. Still no update on Mode 1 etc.

Adult learning

cuts ( and unis less interested)

Guardian proper report no mention of the MOOC

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/feb/21/pop-up-classes-adult-learning-further-education

My guess newspapers so worried about online and social media share of advertising that they are reluctant to report digital disruption potential

needs a bit more to make the post convincing

Notes on Green Screens at Tubers Exeter

I realise I am way behind with edits and reports from BETT and trip to Lancaster. But Exeter situation intervenes. There is now a Tubers Academy, intended for young contributors to YouTube but the space is also available for hire. I have invited JD to join me next Wednesday in the VR space, ( green screens on each wall ) . We will test it out and maybe record some questions or comments.

Could fit with sequence from Lancaster campus or other locations, past or future. My recent topic was the voice interface for computers. But could be the MOOC, university response to the MOOC, or a swich of resources from buildings to online if this was the case. For video there is still an interest in locations so campus architecture is still welcome. But a completely green room raises a question in itself. Still looking into what studio resource is available for different sites.

So suggestions welcome. Do you have an interesting background or an existing talking head on a solid colour?

Topics could include what to make of the Tubers situation. So far I am not sure anyone has made enough from YouTube to cover the fees. But we may meet such people later. Raises a question what skills should be taught in school, uni ? Video edit?

Previously


We will not be messing about so much on Wednesday, actual content sometime soon.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Corbyn PMQs and Guardian sense of fairness

My belief is that the Guardian now starts with opinion and then works out what to do with the reporting. As in the Louise Mensch distinction of belief and reporting. Just my conclusion based on recent observation. BBC News channel interview with John McDonnell could have concentrated on NIC U Turn but diverts to Alastair Campbell comment on Corbyn. Apparently he asked the wrong questions. So I looked on the iPlayer for actual record. Corbyn asked several on topic then switched to social care and education.

Today found a tweet, maybe the BBC source.



Also couple of clips on YouTube



Make your own mind up.

Guardian in print same sort of thing as my tweet remarked on yesterday. Not as full a report as online but similar in intention. Page 4 half way down third column "earlier the issue had dominated PMQs......he then frustrated some of his own backbenchers by switching tack to focus on education". Doubtless the Guardian has a source for this view from "some backbenchers".

I realise this is in the readG blog not the one about the EU and Fleet Street but my belief now is that something similar happened during the referendum. some people are so determined to get rid of Jeremy Corbyn that they undermine the case he is making. Was it really such a good idea for Lord Darling to concentrate on economic issues in support of George Osborne?  My belief is that Corbyn had a much better grasp of the issues that matter to people. The social and educational aspects of the EU could have been much better reported.

Another Guardian editorial suggests that lies are possible online. I now read the Guardian not for news but to be amazed at how they report it. To hear from Parliament I rely on YouTube, RT and the official channel for Jeremy Corbyn,

Friday, February 17, 2017

Time Travel, possible link to Guardian

It may be possible to work with the idea of time travel as a way to communicate with the literary aspect of the Guardian. Recent article in the Review by James Gleick has a couple of quotes worth thinking about. Somehow the world of academic journals seems to assume some long-term value that technology can interfere with. Seems to overlap with forms of print. Sci-fi is associated with a possible positive take on the future.

The more modern sort of person – “the creative, organising, or masterful type” – sees the future as our very reason for being: “Things have been, says the legal mind, and so we are here. The creative mind says we are here because things have yet to be.” Wells, of course, hoped to personify that creative, forward-looking type.

The conclusion has a reasonable take on the current scene around social media-

A river of messages is a “timeline”– you’re in my timeline; I heard it in my timeline – but the sequence is arbitrary. Temporal ordering can scarcely be trusted. The past, the present, the future go round and collide, bumper cars in a chain of distraction. When distance separates the thunder from the lightning, cyberspace puts them back together.
In the wired world, creating the present becomes a communal process. Everyone’s mosaic is crowd-sourced, a photomontage with multiple perspectives. Images of the past, fantasies of the future, live videocams, all shuffled and blended. All time and no time. The path back through history is cluttered, the path forward cloudy.

So this could be a way to look at print and web over time. There are trends but also loops. For example I still think the Guardian may stop the weekday print version but when this happens is unknown. It just seems more likely from time to time. Saturday in long form ok for a while.

So my blogs still include speculation / observation but no precision as to timing.

Sunday, January 29, 2017

Draft outline, digital disruption and business schools

This post is to check out for response and get some updates on recent developments. For a while I have been interested in how media organisations transition with digital technology. It sometimes seems to me that academics and business schools comment about this as if they are not part of it. Somehow the buildings and campus will continue as a base even if FM radio for example disappears in the cloud.

Next week Learning Technologies has some involvement from HE so I will try to check things out. This week at BETT there were a couple of events that might make a lead news item.



Futurelearn won the BETT Award for Free Digital Content/Open Educational Resources for Schools. I don't think they are yet much recognised at HE level. The Open University has cut back on regional support centres in the UK though they continue to invest in Futurelearn. I don't know of other examples where this sort of switch has already happened.











The Department for International Trade had a theatre where one presentation was from the Online Business School. I did do a video but the background noise is a problem Here are some stills to show the gist of it. BETT is a solid tech show and I guess there will be more HE over time, including some more examples of digital plans, maybe with some disruption in the background.

Any links or content most welcome. I will try to do an expanded post in the next week or two.

Saturday, January 21, 2017

Steven Poole , content marketing, MOOC , Peter Scott

Today Steven Poole in Review on native ads and other aspects of being online. Trouble is he makes no obvious mention of the situation around newspapers. Why is the darkside of the web finding so much space in newsprint nowadays? Meanwhile the Postgrad pullout section is the only place for news about the MOOC. See post on what is not at BETT in another blog.

When will the Guardian write about the MOOC in context of a general article on policy and context? Will it involve Peter Scott? Maybe the Tuesday section no longer sells enough advertising to justify the sort of expense required. So the MOOC will only turn up in the pullout sections with the initiative coming from advertisers.

Also could there be reporting of the MOOC as value compared to the Guardian courses? You know the sort of thing - £49 for three hours on how to be a critic. Why not try a MOOC and decide if you want a certificate towards the end of the course? It may not be much more expensive. Surely there is copy here for someone?

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Fake News and loss making newspapers

Things are speeding up. See previous posts for usual comments, here are some notes on recent Guardian.

Paul Mason on Facebook and Google. He likes Soundcloud and Medium but doubts they can survive. I do not think he is fair about the length of clips on YouTube. There is a lot of long clips from lectures and conferences.

10th Jan news that Trinity Mirror is trying to work with the Express. there could be more reporting on the business background for this kind of move.

Today story about "fake news" quickly becomes one about social media

The News Media Association has previously warned ministers that Google and Facebook were unfairly making money out of journalism produced by its members.

I think we should get more about what the plan is and less knocking copy on the web as it is. Any news could be "fake" and needs to be considered with a views on who is writing it. the newspapers need to consider that the web is read / write so involves the audience, people like us, see previous posts etc.

If Jeff Jarvis was still writing on a Monday I would be more positive about weekday print continuing in 2017. As it is I expect more about "fake news" and not much in print about what the news organisation websites are trying to do or how the public can relate to them.

So far neither Google of Facebook have closed a site without warning destroying all content I contributed. Sorry to keep repeating this, probably time to move on.