Sunday, May 28, 2017

Social media is significant part of the 2017 election

In short, a tumultuous week showed mainstream media doing what it’s supposed to: reporting, reflecting, arguing, stirring. And social media? Many heartfelt exchanges, many echoes of shock and sorrow, but with customary fakery and trolling – instructions for bomb-making mingled with denunciation and perspective damned hard to come by.

So says Peter Preston. No perspective?

Thing is, may be changing. See another blog on Fleet Street in Cyberspace and Europe for recent comment on anti Corbyn bias. But Preston has this covered for the BBC

 There’s been mounting disapproval over its hostile treatment of Jeremy Corbyn, and deference to Theresa, since campaigning began. But nobody who saw Laura Kuenssberg tear into the PM on U-turn morning could maintain that now

However at that time the press were in competition to find the most quotable manner in which to be obvious. Have a look at the IRA questions from @afneil #marr etc. btw I still think Kuenssberg doc on Corbyn and referendum missed out a whole section on Lord Darling, how Lord Darling came to be centre stage, soforth. Someone still knows, only a year ago)

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Andrew Rawnsley

The focus on leadership, the “presidential” strategy that looked such a no-brainer when this election was called, has not had the effect that most anticipated. I think some of this is down to Jeremy Corbyn. Not because he has fought an outstanding election, but because his frailties as a candidate for the premiership were extremely well known before the campaign had started. A hefty majority of his own MPs had previously declared him unfit for leadership, so anything the Tories had to add to that was likely to be superfluous comment. I expect the Tories to launch a monstering of the Labour leader in the final leg of the campaign. This may not have the impact that they are looking for, if I am right to suspect that attitudes towards him were already largely baked in to Labour’s share.

Thing is, I think this is completely wrong. Guardian and BBC as much as any media have been in total Corbyn attack mode since he stood for election as Labour leader. No change there maybe. But public image much changed by talking direct to camera without any spin from press reporters.

Also social media allows direct communication, feedback, response to questions.
Next few weeks could be interesting, followed by more facts and analysis on who reads newspapers and what to think.

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repeating yet again but meant as a positive suggestion

possibly Guardian Media Group in in transformation to something online

when the print version is always knocking social media it is not helping the brand

Guardian Unlimited Talk trashed the work of a mass of people, lost from history as in Guardian writing

but consequence continues






Sunday, May 21, 2017

please stop knocking online media @gabyhinsliff

Observer has an article by Gaby Hinsliff considering the possibility that there is media bias against Corbyn.

Just to repeat a few things.

she mentions "rivers of online abuse" aimed at Laura Kuenssberg. My concerns are the show she did about the referendum that implied Corbyn was to blame for Labour performance. The section on the phase when Labour was asked to take over ignored the actual presentations from Brown and Lord Darling. It was just wrong. Also recent interview reveals that Labour policy on EU trade is very different to Conservatives, this is just not what comes over.



Main thing though is the remarks about online. --"propaganda sheets like the Canary"...reporters worry about truth in a hyper partisan world...

As far as I know the BBC reported two heckles during 2016, both against Jeremy Corbyn. On Twitter and other sources it has been suggested that one was connected with Portland Comms and the other with the Lib Dems. Thing is I have never found any contrary reporting so what to think?

"Facebook messages tend to be shared among the likeminded"

Newspapers have a bit of a funding crisis and spend less on news resources. opinion is the thing. so they become tighter on marketing and discipline. online has more variety as far as I can tell.

You are offering an apology for the rest of Fleet Street and the Guardian Corbyn knocking. My guess is that quite a lot of readers will move online to find media they can trust or talk to each other.

Guardian Media Group so hostile to online in print version it is hard to accept the online version as genuinely part of that scene.



Tuesday, May 16, 2017

alt left may be best label for Corbyn supporters

I notice alt left seems ok in Guardian terms as they try to promote online in USA.

opinion found online.

Their line on Corbyn in UK print still mostly knocking though. I will explore more about this alt left and see what makes sense.

The idea that Corbyn Brexit detail deserves no space in print makes no sense at all.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Are buildings still a good investment for universities?

This is just a note, bit bigger than a tweet.

Not sure where this week will end up on radio. Thursday I hope to talk to the Storyteller about a fiction drama located on Lancaster campus. So this post is a reminder about reality.

The MOOC is better thought of now than a while ago. LEarning happens anyway as part of social media but this still not integrated with academic scene.

Futurelearn seems to be getting closer to income streams. Working with Deakin so model will reach UK sometime. See recent story in EdSurge for more.

If online education is seen as viable, when will there be a question about buildings? So far much investment has been in the campus, some of it iconic. This will continue and to make interesting video we need good sets. But presumably Deakin spend on IBM Watson funds that are not spent on bricks. The OU has closed regional centres and spent more on FutureLearn so far. When will this be seen as sensible, and what follows?

More later.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Polly Toynbee, BBC , Soft Fleet Street

Just catching up on TV, missed it this morning.

Andrew Marr on YouTube already with Jeremy Corbyn interview.

Sunday Politics on BBC catchup.

Polly Toynbee as balance between the Sun and the Spectator. Difference of view on Jeremy Corbyn? Not a lot.

Would Labour use a drone against ISIS? Will the USA request such a thing? It may turn out that the relevant issues during the election are not those supposed by the Fleet Street / BBC news operation.

Andrew Marr claimed that Corbyn and May similar on Brexit as both want a Single Market. Who is sure about this? Who has eaten the cake and or kept it? Surely May will be asked some questions later.

But Guardian columnists mostly just knocking Corbyn one would guess.

Sunday, March 19, 2017

notes on mode 1 , mooc etc

Later there will be another post on online courses, starting with business schools.

Probably a longer one ahead of BETT next year. There is not enough reporting on what happens.

I base my guess on the Guardian still. Both what appears and what is hidden or mostly hidden. "special report" on 7 March can't find on official website but is on Pressreader. Seems to have been supported in print by half page ad from University of Derby. They are mentioned, as is Falmouth and Imperial.

MOOC mention in last column, then Futurelearn.

I still think Futurelearn is major news, as was obvious at BETT.

Helena Pozniak is a freelance journalist, this "special report" is not part of the main education pages.

Page 35 Peter Scott complains about commercial pressure but no mention of MOOC or even tech. My guess is still that the innovation will not come from the existing research stars, see previous posts. Still no update on Mode 1 etc.

Adult learning

cuts ( and unis less interested)

Guardian proper report no mention of the MOOC

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2017/feb/21/pop-up-classes-adult-learning-further-education

My guess newspapers so worried about online and social media share of advertising that they are reluctant to report digital disruption potential

needs a bit more to make the post convincing

Notes on Green Screens at Tubers Exeter

I realise I am way behind with edits and reports from BETT and trip to Lancaster. But Exeter situation intervenes. There is now a Tubers Academy, intended for young contributors to YouTube but the space is also available for hire. I have invited JD to join me next Wednesday in the VR space, ( green screens on each wall ) . We will test it out and maybe record some questions or comments.

Could fit with sequence from Lancaster campus or other locations, past or future. My recent topic was the voice interface for computers. But could be the MOOC, university response to the MOOC, or a swich of resources from buildings to online if this was the case. For video there is still an interest in locations so campus architecture is still welcome. But a completely green room raises a question in itself. Still looking into what studio resource is available for different sites.

So suggestions welcome. Do you have an interesting background or an existing talking head on a solid colour?

Topics could include what to make of the Tubers situation. So far I am not sure anyone has made enough from YouTube to cover the fees. But we may meet such people later. Raises a question what skills should be taught in school, uni ? Video edit?

Previously


We will not be messing about so much on Wednesday, actual content sometime soon.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Corbyn PMQs and Guardian sense of fairness

My belief is that the Guardian now starts with opinion and then works out what to do with the reporting. As in the Louise Mensch distinction of belief and reporting. Just my conclusion based on recent observation. BBC News channel interview with John McDonnell could have concentrated on NIC U Turn but diverts to Alastair Campbell comment on Corbyn. Apparently he asked the wrong questions. So I looked on the iPlayer for actual record. Corbyn asked several on topic then switched to social care and education.

Today found a tweet, maybe the BBC source.



Also couple of clips on YouTube



Make your own mind up.

Guardian in print same sort of thing as my tweet remarked on yesterday. Not as full a report as online but similar in intention. Page 4 half way down third column "earlier the issue had dominated PMQs......he then frustrated some of his own backbenchers by switching tack to focus on education". Doubtless the Guardian has a source for this view from "some backbenchers".

I realise this is in the readG blog not the one about the EU and Fleet Street but my belief now is that something similar happened during the referendum. some people are so determined to get rid of Jeremy Corbyn that they undermine the case he is making. Was it really such a good idea for Lord Darling to concentrate on economic issues in support of George Osborne?  My belief is that Corbyn had a much better grasp of the issues that matter to people. The social and educational aspects of the EU could have been much better reported.

Another Guardian editorial suggests that lies are possible online. I now read the Guardian not for news but to be amazed at how they report it. To hear from Parliament I rely on YouTube, RT and the official channel for Jeremy Corbyn,